Monday, 26 February 2018

Contactless Payment Methods ๐Ÿ’ฒ


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  • 54% of people in Ireland think electronic payment methods will be the only payment method in the future.
  • 22% say they spend more money by using the “contactless” payment method.
  • 40% think that Ireland should act faster in implementing electronic payment methods.
  • 44% of people in Ireland say would go shopping in a store with no checkouts, like the new Amazon Go store.
Keeping in mind that it seems that cold hard cash might not exist in the future and the contactless feature will become increasingly popular in Ireland, it is important to note that one out of five (22%) state they actually spend more money in general by using the contactless payment feature. The majority (71%) state that when they are paying by contactless, it doesn’t have an impact on the amount they spend and 7% say they spend even less by using the contactless feature.
 
Contactless payment systems are a popular method of payment that is used in most shops nowadays. Methods of payments are changing, with more people shopping online and paying via apps such as Just Eat and MyTaxi people are using their bank cards more frequently. Although paying by cash is anonymous, paying by card is convenient, secure and quick. With the opening of the Amazon Go store in Seattle in January, Amazon has made the next step in electronic payment methods. Instead of paying by card or handing over cash, customers scan their Amazon Go App on their phone when they walk into the store, grab whatever they want and leave. Their account is automatically charged when they walk out. Even though it opened in the US and there is no store like it in Ireland, 33% of women and 48% of men in Ireland are aware of this store. 44% would go shopping in a store like this, 23% are unsure and 33% state it is unlikely for them to shop in a store like this.  Some people go as far to say that cash won’t exist for much longer and when you take Sweden as an example, nearly half of all banks don’t accept cash anymore. It is no surprise that most people in Ireland (54%) think that electronic payment methods will be the only method of payment in the future.

iReach Insights conducted nationally representative survey and 1,000 adults were asked about their opinion about electronic payment methods, especially contactless payment and their concerns surrounding these. Interestingly, not only do more than the half (54%) of people in Ireland think electronic payment methods will be the only one in the future, 40% share the opinion that Ireland should act faster in implementing electronic payment methods.

Also, the majority of people in Ireland (78%) own a contactless credit / debit card. 57% of them use the contactless feature very often, 23% sometimes, 13% rarely and only 7% use never the contactless feature.  The frequency of usage differs with the different ages of those involved. The younger age group uses the contactless feature a lot more than the older age cohort.

The people who would rather not go shopping in a store like this were asked about their concerns and here are the TOP 5 concerns: 1. Protect personal data (46%), 2. Lose track of spending (44%), 3. Unsafe (36%), 4. Avoid impulse buying (31%) and 5. Feels awkward (23%).


When about it comes to technology, people are always concerned about their personal data, hackers and privacy breaches. Especially when it comes up to money, people’s fears are amplified. As the advances in technology can’t be stopped, it is becoming increasingly important for people to implement measures to protect themselves or avoid the new features altogether. 

For more information on these research findings please feel free to call iReach on 01-2143740 or email to oisin.byrne@ireachhq.com

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Wednesday, 21 February 2018

Smart Homes๐Ÿ 


iReach Insights Press Release   

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  • 34% of adults in Ireland are likely to implement smart home technology in the future.
  • Only 10% of people in Ireland state they own a smart home, but 83% of them say it makes life much easier.
  • 45% fear that people could steal personal data concerning their daily life habits and over one-third (36%) are concerned that someone could spy on them because they have a smart home.
  • The majority (80%) who have a smart home would recommend a smart home to anyone who is thinking about getting one and 45% can’t imagine living without one any more.
  • 18% of people in Ireland use an “Intelligent Voice Assistant” and 68% state that they are useful.
  • Almost the half of people in Ireland (49%) think that app technology offers more advantages than disadvantages.
Although new technology has many benefits, people who have smart homes still have concerns about their smart homes. 45% fear that people could steal personal data concerning their daily life habits and 36% are concerned that someone could spy on them because they have a smart home. Also, almost the half (48%) state that smart home technology is expensive. Interestingly, Men (50%) seem to find that smart home technology more complicated than women (24%).
Overall, the majority (80%) would recommend a smart home to anyone who is thinking about getting one and 45% can’t imagine living without it any more. Looking to the future and of those who don’t live in a smart home already, 34% are likely to implement smart home technology in the future.
Furthermore, 71% think that children should learn in school how to properly choose and use apps, which shows how far technology has integrated itself into Irish society. Technology is becoming a bigger part of our lives and people agree that children should be taught this in school.


 
Smart homes are becoming increasingly popular and with improvements in technology, implementation of smart homes will increase if people in Ireland embrace this technology which can allow for an easier way of living. It is not surprising that so called “smart technology” is on the rise and we are able to connect on. iReach Insights conducted a nationally representative survey and 1,000 adults were asked about their opinion about smart technology in general and smart homes, meaning a home equipped with lighting, heating, and electronic devices that can be controlled remotely by a smartphone or computer.

18% of people in Ireland currently use an “Intelligent Voice Assistant” like Alexa, Siri or the Google-Assistant and 68% state that they are useful.

Unexpectedly, only one in ten adults in Ireland own a smart home. The majority of them (83%) think that a smart home makes their life much easier. Furthermore, 72% say they are more relaxed since they can control their home from wherever they are and nearly two-thirds (62%) feel safer at home because of it. In terms of the financial reward, 64% of people in Ireland who own a smart home state that implementing smart technology has saved them money.

In light of these results, it remains to be seen how the technology industry will deal with the concerns of privacy and potential hacker-attacks. All in all, it seems that smart technology has more positive effects on people’s lives than one may expect. This is also confirmed by the fact that almost the half of people in Ireland (49%) think that app technology offers more advantages than disadvantages.


For more information on these research findings please feel free to call iReach on 01-2143740 or email to oisin.byrne@ireachhq.com


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Monday, 19 February 2018

Fitness Apps and Devices๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿ“ฑ

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  • 30% of people using apps have serious concerns about them.
  • TOP 3 concerns adults in Ireland have about apps are: 1. Access to personal data (86%), 2. Privacy breach (67%), 3. Tracking abilities (61%).
  • 35% of app users in Ireland use apps concerning their health, body, fitness and/or diet.
  • Surprisingly, 37% agree that the Government & insurance companies should have access to (anonymous) data of health & fitness apps.
  • More women (40%) than men (30%) in Ireland use health and/or fitness apps and 68% of them believe health apps improve their behaviour.
  • One in five adults in Ireland use a fitness device.
  • Three out of four (74%) would recommend their fitness device.
  • Most app users (81%) use free of charge apps.


Since smartphone and tablet technology is an integral component of the lives of people in Ireland and the New Year’s resolutions might still be in the back of some people minds, it seems like more people are using apps to improve their health and fitness behaviours. 
iReach Insights conducted nationally representative survey and 1,000 adults were asked about their opinion about apps in general, their usage of health and fitness apps and fitness devices.

Almost everyone has a smartphone and/or a tablet (92%) and 92% are using apps on their smart devices. Unfortunately, 30% of those using apps, have serious concerns about using apps. The TOP 5 concerns adults in Ireland have about apps are: 1. Access to personal data (86%), 2. Privacy breach (67%), 3. Tracking abilities (61%), 4. Hackers (61%) and 5. Storage loss on phone / tablet (47%).

The majority of app users (81%) are using free of charge apps and only 19% pay for using the apps each month. Of those (19%) they pay an average of €5.85 a month.

35% of app users in Ireland use apps concerning their health, body, fitness and/or diet. More women (40%) than men (30%) use these health/fitness apps. Here are the TOP 5 health and fitness apps used: 1. Fitness tracker / Steps counter (77%), 2. Diet / Calorie counter (23%), 3. Workout /fitness program (19%), 4. Healthy food (18%) and 5. Sleep monitoring (16%).
The biggest gap between male and female health app usage can be found on competitive fitness apps. 18% of men, but only 6% of women use them. All in all, two-thirds (68%) believe health / fitness apps improve their behaviour.
One out of five people living in Ireland (21%) uses a fitness device and over the half of them (53%) use Fitbit. In terms of the device used, 48% have a watch, 46% a wristband and / or 4% a chip as a fitness device. Also, the majority (57%) think that fitness devices have some kind of positive effect on their health and fitness habits. Furthermore, three out of four (74%) would recommend their fitness device.
On the topic of health apps and fitness devices, people living in Ireland were asked, if they think that the Government and insurance companies should have access to (anonymous) data from any kind of health or fitness apps. Inconsistent with the TOP 1 concern about apps, which is access to personal data, 37% think, that the Government and insurance companies should have access to the data to improve the Irish health system and to create specific health programs.
In light of the health topic and the possibility of the incoming sugar tax, 44% of people in Ireland think that the sugar tax won’t help lower the obesity rate of children, but 74% agree that banning energy drinks for those under the age of 16 is a good idea.

These results show that health & fitness apps and devices seem to offer an actual support in changing and improving habits in people’s daily lives.

For more information on these research findings please feel free to call iReach on 01-2143740 or email to oisin.byrne@ireachhq.com


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Tuesday, 13 February 2018

Valentine's Day ๐Ÿ’˜๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ‘ซ

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  • Although 71% of us don’t like Valentine's Day 61% of us in a relationship will still celebrate it.
  • 61% of adults in Ireland will celebrate Valentine’s Day.
  • 58% of men and 46% of women living in Ireland will buy a present for their partner.
  • Top gifts include: Card (52%), Chocolates (34%), Flowers (33%), Aftershave / Perfume (14%) and Wine / Champagne (9%).
  • 64% say that spending too much time on the phone during a dinner date is the worst nightmare.
  • Liam Neeson (23%) and Amy Huberman (22%) are the favourites for celebrity Valentine’s Dates.
  • Brian O’Driscoll and Amy Huberman (27%) are Ireland’s favourite celebrity couple, followed by Michael D and Sabine Higgins (17%) and Daniel and Majella O’Donnell (11%).
29% of people in Ireland state they are a fan of Valentine’s Day and 71% aren’t. The number of people that is a fan of Valentine’s day has increased in the year 2018 (last year – 26% of people were fans of V day).

The TOP 3 reasons for people that are fans of Valentines day::
1. Good reminder to appreciate your relationship (58%)
2. Nice day to think about your partner (56%)
3. It celebrates love (50%). 

Here are the TOP 3 reasons for people not to be a fan: 
1. Too commercialised (79%)
2. Everything is overpriced (45%)
3. Not special (31%)

Although 71% of us don’t like Valentine's Day 61% of us in a relationship will still celebrate it. Of those of us who are not in a relationship, one in five (20%) will celebrate Valentine’s anyways. This figure has almost doubled since last year with only 11% of singletons celebrating it last year.
60% of people will celebrate Valentine’s day with dinner, 24% will stay in and watch a movie and 17% will order takeaway. Just half (52%) of people in Ireland are going to buy something for their partner (More males – 58% than females – 46%). Top gifts include: Card (52%), Chocolates (34%), Flowers (33%), Aftershave / Perfume (14%) and Wine / Champagne (9%).

Unlucky for some – 13% of adults in Ireland have forgotten about Valentines Day when they were in a relationship. We also wanted to find out what people think are the most annoying habits when out on a dinner date. Top most annoying habits are; 

1. Being on the phone (64%) 
2. Being Rude to waiting staff (60%) 
3. Talking about their ex (57%)
4. Bad manners (54%)
5. Forgetting their name (39%)



People identified their perfect Valentines dates:

Amongst the men the TOP 3 are 
1. Liam Neeson (23%), 
2. Jamie Dornan (22%)
3. Colin Farrell (12%). 

Amongst the women, the TOP 3 are 
1. Amy Huberman (22%)
2. Saoirse Ronan (19%)
3. Laura Whitmore (19%). 

Who tops the leader board for the favourite celebrity couple? Brian O’Driscoll and Amy Huberman (27%) do, closely followed by Michael D and Sabine Higgins (17%) and thirdly Daniel and Majella O’Donnell (11%).

For more information on these research findings please feel free to call iReach on 01-2143740 or email to oisin.byrne@ireachhq.com


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Tuesday, 6 February 2018

Social Media Responsibility: 64% of people in Ireland think that the acceptable age to start using social media is between 14 and 17 years!

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  • 55% think that more restrictions should be put in place on content posted on social media.
  • 64% of adults in Ireland think that between 14-17 years old is the appropriate age to start using social media.
  • 66% of people in Ireland are a member of at least one social media platform.
  • 89% of these are members of Facebook, followed by 68% who are subscribed to YouTube and 42% signed up to Twitter.
  • 62% of women in Ireland think there should be more restrictions and policies put in place on social media platforms.
  • Over the half of people in Ireland (59%) think that the individual and the social media platform itself are equally responsible for the content posted on the platform.
  • Almost two-thirds (64%) of adults in Ireland think that between 14-17 years is the appropriate age to start using social media.

It has been reported widely in the media about the growing issue of technology and smartphone addiction amongst the younger generation, meaning the importance of education and regulation surrounding online networking and social media has never been more vital. Today is Safer Internet Day, which is an EU wide initiative to promote a safer internet for all users, especially young people. Facebook is making it easier for users to find privacy settings, establishing a new privacy centre in an effort to give users more control of their information. “Privacy controls are only powerful if you know how to find and use them,” Erin Egan, Facebook’s chief privacy officer, said in a blog post. 

Despite having the option to change your privacy settings 13% still have their Facebook privacy on Public. The announcement was made in anticipation of the EU’s new General Data Protection Regulations, which comes into effect on 25 May this year. Three quarters of people are consuming some sort of social media content and 66% are members of a social media platform. It is no surprise that social media plays a bigger role in society and that impact will probably increase in the future.

iReach Insights conducted a nationally representative survey and 1,000 adults were asked about their opinion about social media in general, who the responsibility lies with when it comes to posting on social media and the restrictions that should be imposed.


As mentioned above, two thirds of adults in Ireland (66%) are a member of a social media platform.  81% of people in the 16-34 age group, 63% in the 35-54 group and 43% in the 55+ group are a member of at least one social media platform, revealing the popularity of social media platforms amongst the younger age cohort. From the 66% in total, 89% are a member of Facebook, followed by 68% of YouTube, 42% of Twitter, 39% of Instagram and 30% of LinkedIn [28% Snapchat, 23% Pinterest, 22% Skype].

The majority of people in Ireland (55%) think that more restrictions and policies regarding the content that can be posted on social media should be put in place. Interestingly, 62% of women share this opinion whereas only 47% of men do.
Only 7% say that the existing restrictions and policies are too strict. Not forgetting that 25% are unsure of the restrictions and policies that are currently in place. In general, three quarters (74%) think that it isn’t appropriate to share shocking images or videos on social media platforms surrounding sensitive topics.


When it comes to the responsibility for content that is posted online on social media, 59% state the individual is responsible. All the same, 59% think the social media platform itself is equally responsible. 34% place the responsibility on online regulatory authorities, 14% on the government and 8% on the police. Understandably, 83% of adults in Ireland say, that smartphones should offer more settings to protect children and teenagers.
 
When talking about responsibility and the potential damage social media platforms can cause, it is important to mention privacy settings which can protect people online to some extent. For the Top 4 platforms most used by people in Ireland: on Facebook 17% set their account on ‘totally private’. Over half (66%) on Facebook set their account to ‘private’, 13% on ‘public’ [4% don’t know their settings].

Ireland has opted for the lowest age permissible under upcoming EU data law which is 13 years old. In Ireland, it means that Facebook, Google, Twitter or any other company can mostly (though not fully) use a 13-year-old's personal information in the same way they would use an adult's information. Almost two-thirds (64%) of people in Ireland think that the acceptable age to start using social media platforms is between 14 and 17 years and not any younger. 23% state the right age is 18+. 11% state that the age between 11-13 is acceptable and the minority (2%) thinks 10 years or younger is appropriate.

Even though social media platforms are not new anymore, a lot of people still have big concerns about them and wish for stricter policies and restrictions. Facebook is moving in the right direction and making the privacy settings more visible for their users. So what else can be done to minimize potential negative consequences and to bring out the more positive impacts of social media?
For more information on these research findings please feel free to call iReach on 01-2143740 or email to oisin.byrne@ireachhq.com


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Thursday, 1 February 2018

What is Influencer Marketing?

Measuring the Impact of Influencers on your brand





Are there different flavours of influencer marketing?

Yes, there are different flavours’.

There is the celebrity or category influencer model, where brands engage with people who are influential in their vertical or industry but may not yet be customer advocates (think: Shure Microphones using J-Lo or Lansinoh baby bottles using influential mom bloggers.)

There is the everyday, brand advocate model. This involves identifying people who are actual customers/users of your brand, product, or service, who are also advocates looking for an opportunity to build a closer relationship with the brand they love.

Large consumer brands have millions of such advocates, many who have enormous influence. Connecting with these people has proven to have more impact, including long-tail impact, than celebrity influencer campaigns, although both flavours often run side-by-side and can complement one another.

Finally, as mentioned above, there are opt-in influencers, who can be “rented” – in exchange for sweepstakes entries, coupons, or other sponsored programs – to post about the brand on social.

This should not be considered a “flavour” of influencer marketing, since even a quick look at the “#sponsored” hashtag on Twitter will reveal that these people do not spur engagement, they do not have real followers, they tweet about competing brands, and they are not remotely authentic.

The profiles that engage with these opt-in, incentivized programs are built solely for the purpose of entering sweepstakes or getting free products. These “influencers” will hurt your brand, so when I think “influencer marketing,” I do not include this group. (See this article on the stark reality of this kind of these incentivized influencers.)

What’s the most challenging aspect of influencer marketing? Identifying influencers? Actually engaging them? Tracking the impact?

Brands face issues around all three, really, but each activity has its own obstacles.

On the measurement front, there is a huge shift going on.

Metrics used to fall into the “reach” or “impressions” bucket, because that’s what people were used to and comfortable with, and that’s what they were being offered by vendors. The reality today is that there’s an enormous opportunity for brands to measure much, much more when it comes to word-of-mouth and influencer strategies; they just need the tools to do it.

That being said, “reach,” as a KPI, is on the outs. It’s still worth looking at as a general metric, but it shouldn’t serve as an indicator of performance or be considered a success metric.

Here’s what I’m talking about. As a web marketer, I might measure website visits, but a spike in visits doesn’t automatically signal success for me. Quality visits, however, do. If visits don’t provide a desired result (conversions, purchases, downloads, etc.), then a spike does me no good.

People should think about reach in the same way. If a spike in reach does take place, it’s the responsibility of the brand, the agency, AND the vendor to validate that this reach translated into actual, quality results. Did it result in reviews? Did it result in sales?

In other words, you always must ask, “What did I want from influencers in the first place and did increased ‘reach’ get me there?”
Measuring success is a mix of the right tools coupled with the right strategies, and sometimes takes a little bit of thinking and planning.
The fact of the matter is, success in influencer marketing can be measured, and there really isn’t an excuse anymore for measuring quantity over quality.

So, what is influencer marketing, actually?

This should really be two questions. The first is, “What are people actually doing when they say they’re doing influencer marketing?”

The second is, “What do you think ‘influencer marketing’ SHOULD BE?”

Influencer marketing should be as follows: Brands partnering with people who have influence over their own networks, both on- and offline, who will spread authentic word-of-mouth for those brands, and who create real impact and business value for the brand when they do so.

The influencers brands partner with should either be influential within the industry or space that the brand is directly a part of, or they should be customers/potential customers of the brand already. In other words, if I see an influencer promoting something, I ask myself, “Do I have reason to believe that this person would authentically use this product or service even if they weren’t in a partnership with the brand?”

Influencer marketing all too often boils down to: Brands and agencies getting people – celebrities, social celebs, bloggers, etc. – who seem to have a large follower count to share tweets or content in exchange for a fee, free stuff, or entry into a sweepstakes, regardless of whether or not that person has any expertise or is even likely to be a user of the product or service.
 
What is it NOT?


Influencer marketing is NOT the use of influencers who are not already fans of your brand or have no influence in your category or vertical.

It is NOT engaging with influencers who share or distribute content from your competitors (which is extremely common).

It is NOT working with influencers or other people who do not have expertise in your industry, service, or vertical.

It is NOT asking any consumer who is willing to tweet a hashtag to become an influencer without first vetting them.


Brands need to find people who, when they talk about a brand, service, or product, are viewed as authentic and true customers/advocates of the brand. (See this Gawker article for a nice summary of what’s happening right now and how this is all changing.)


Identifying Influencers

On the identification front, many brands don’t have the resources to manually sift through their communities to find good people, and when they do have the resources, often all they have to go on is a single “comment” or some other isolated action.

It’s extremely important to understand who potential influencers are as people. When they talk, do they influence other people? Have they interacted with your brand before? I
f so, how many times and in what way? How passionate are they? What drives that passion? And so on.

Engaging Influencers

There is the challenge of simply being a good marketer and knowing your audience well enough to create content and marketing that resonates with them and generates engagement.

Still, from a strategy perspective, there are many things that brands miss out on when it comes to engagement. Engagement must spur advocacy. That is, when an influencer interacts with your brand, it’s important to make these interactions visible to that person’s network.

For example, when you give people the opportunity to connect, interact, or engage, you should also give them an opportunity to share and bring their friends into the conversation. Always provide a catalyst for this kind of advocacy or word-of-mouth marketing. And make it easy to do; don’t force influencers to find their own way of getting the word out.

Brands often miss this last point and influencer conversations happen on the brand’s site, or within the brand’s community, and stay there, never finding their way into the larger network of that influencer’s connections.

The brands that are best at engaging people are the ones who aren’t afraid to be personable and build relationships with people. Brands need to be able to step out of that “corporate” persona, especially on social, and let people feel like they’re interacting with some ONE, not some THING

Finally, brands need to think of word-of-mouth as a channel, something that’s always on and that builds exponentially over time. They need to treat word-of-mouth and influencers the same as they would any other channel in their mix (e.g., PR, display, eCommerce, etc.) and not just think in terms of campaigns.


To find out more about iReach Insights, check out our website: http://ireachhq.com/